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Breitling Transocean Chronograph Unitime

You might remember that not so long ago, Breitling announced that it would be partnering up with David Beckham to promote the brand and its most exciting watches. That is finally coming to pass, as the football star recently posed for promotional photos at Mojave Air & Space Port in California. The new ad makes use of both the company’s new relationship with Beckham and its long-time connection with aviation and marine travel.

The watch Beckham is currently promoting is the Transocean Chronograph Unitime. This timepiece is so unmistakably Breitling that it’s the perfect piece to be promoted by a new brand ambassador, as the watch embodies many of the company’s best qualities. Some of those are immediately apparent. For instance, a single glance at this watch will tell even a person who knows very little about watches that this piece was designed for travelers. The black (or white) dial features an image of the world, with latitude and longitude lines. Three sub-dials rest around its perimeter, at the three, six, and nine o’clock positions. Outside of this round image are 12 red-gold batons for hour-markers, and outside of these is a small chapter ring. The outermost stuff on the dial is the list of city names appearing around it, making it easy to tell the time in any time zone, a great feature if you fly a lot.

The movement in this watch is one of Breitling’s own automatic movements, the B05 caliber. Like many other watches by Breitling, this one is a COSC-certified chronometer. This movement uses a double-disc system to display the 24 world time zones. It has a 70-hour power reserve and is housed in a 46-millimeter red gold or stainless steel case. There are a couple of variations on the strap/bracelet, probably to help it go along with the case more.

Overall, this watch has a very old-fashioned look. As a matter of fact, it looks like something Breitling themselves would have made several decades ago, but the developments in the movement and the spirit of the watch itself are still very much a thing of today’s more and more connected world.

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